01/04/2016

Transportation

หัวข้อTransportation copy

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How to Get There

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There’s many routes to approach  Chalerm Raja Gumaree 60th (Chamjuree 10) building

  • By BTS

The nearest station to the conference hall is National Stadium Station. After get off of BTS, take a walk  for about 15min through MBK department store as presented below, Chalerm Raja Gumaree 60th (Chamjuree 10) building is 600m away from MBK.

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  • By Bus

Local buses that run through Phayathai rd. and arrive in front of MBK department store are route 27, 29, 36, 36ก, 65 and 501. Then walk up the street according to the map for around 10 mins. For further information please contact tel.1348 or check the website http://www.bmta.co.th

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Getting to and from Chulalongkorn University

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From Suvarnabhumi Airport

I. By Train

By train:  Firstly, take the Airport Rail Link from the basement of the Suvanapoomi international airport to Phayathai Station (45THB) that interchanging with BTS Sky train. (Link : http://www.bts.co.th/customer/en/02-route-area.aspx) It will take around 30-40min for ordinary train, and 15min for express. Get off at Phayathai Station,  get on BTS Sky train from Phayathai station to National Stadium Station (25THB, changing the BTS line at Siam station) for about 10min. After get off of BTS, take a walk  for about 15min through MBK department store as presented below, Chalerm Raja Gumaree 60th (Chamjuree 10) building is 600m away from MBK.

II. By Rental

Car Rental car Chula university is 30-40km far from Suvanapoomi international airport. If the traffic is flow it would takes only 30 min to reach chula, but usually there’s always a traffic jam along the way so it would probably takes 1-2hours to reach chula university by car.

  1. Airport Limousine (24 hours service) Charging around 1,150-2,600 THB. Check the type of the car as follow link >> http://suvarnabhumiairport.com/en/115-limousine
  2. Taxi (24 hours service) Platform of Passenger Terminal on the 1st Floor, Gates 4 and  Charging around 300-500 THB. >> http://suvarnabhumiairport.com/en/117-taxi

From Don muang airport

I. By Rental

Car Rental car Chula university is 25 – 30km far from Don muang airport. If the traffic is flow it would takes only 35 min to reach chula, but usually there’s always a traffic jam along the way so it would probably takes 1-2hours to reach chula university by car.

  1. By Taxi  (24 hours service) Platform of Passenger Terminal on the 1st Floor, Gates 8 and  Charging around 300-500 THB. >> http://donmueangairportthai.com/en/381-public-transport

Getting Around Bangkok

How to go

  • By Bus

Visitors can travel by bus to Bangkok from Thailand’s neighboring countries with varying levels of ease. From Malaysia, one can cross by bus into Thailand through various border checkpoints in Songkhla, Yala, and Narathiwat provinces, although most busses will head to the hub of bus travel into, out of, and around southern Thailand, Hat Yai. From Hat Yai there are direct busses to Bangkok. Most busses from Laos originate in Vientiane and cross the Mekong River to the Thai border town of Nong Khai, where it is possible to arrange for a bus transfer to Bangkok. The primary route on a Cambodian bus to Thailand is across the border at the respective towns of Poipet and Aranyaprathet. From Aranyaprathet one can easily arrange bus or minibus transport to Bangkok.

  • By train

At present, the only standard train service to Bangkok is via the Malaysian border town of Butterworth. Travelers from Singapore and Kuala Lumpur can travel by train to Bangkok, but not without stopping to change trains. The journey from Singapore can last up to 48 hours as two changes of trains are required and there are numerous stops along the way to Bangkok. First class sleeper cars can make a train trip to Bangkok more enjoyable, though comfort and convenience come at a price; one can travel the Eastern & Oriental Express, a throw-back colonial-style luxury train that services Butterworth and Bangkok on a once weekly schedule.

  • By air

Bangkok serves as a major international hub for air travel, with the new Suvarnabhumi International Airport (BKK) hosting over 40 million visitors and transit passengers each year. Dozens of domestic and international air carriers bring passengers to Bangkok from most major cities in Asia, Europe, North America, and Australia.    In addition to outstanding dining and shopping, the Suvarnabhumi Airport features a transportation center that provides visitors with easy transfer from the airport to destinations throughout the kingdom as well as rail, bus, taxi, and limousine service to all districts in the Bangkok metropolitan area. The city center is only 30 kilometers west of the airport and features a new electric rail line that provides easy access to the city center. The former primary airport, Don Muang, located 20 kilometers north of the city center, no longer services international flights, functioning as a minor domestic airport and airstrip for charter flights to and from Bangkok.

Recommended

01

  • The Grand Palace 

Every visitor to Bangkok should see the magnificent buildings within the Grand Palace compound to get a feeling of the grandeur architectural style.Since the founding of Bangkok as the Nations capital by King Rama I, The Grand Palace has been the major architectural symbol of The Thai Royal Family.

02

  • Wat Pho

Wat Phra Chetuphon Wimonmangkalaram or Wat Pho, as it’s commonly known, was built in the 16th century and regarded as the royal temple of the reign of King Rama I, is famous for two things: (1) the 46-meter-long Reclining Buddha built in 1832 featuring the feet beautifully inlaid with mother-of-pearls and (2) the Thai massage.       Wat Pho is also regarded as the country’s first public university as when King Rama III ordered a restoration of the temple, he demanded a revision of lost sciences, segmented into eight categories and engraved them onto several stone inscriptions (later been registered the UNESCO Memory of the World since 2008) so people were free to read and learn—and Thai massage was one of eight the categories. After wandering around wall paintings, you can stop by at the massage pavilion to try traditional Thai massage using ancient techniques to release muscle tensions. A selection of Thai massage courses are also available for those who are interested.

Opening hours: Daily 8.30 a.m. – 6.00 p.m.  Admission: 100 baht

03

  • China Town

Bangkok’s Chinatown, Thailand’s largest Chinese community, is commonly known among Thais as Yaowarat, according to the name of the road where it is located. The Chinese community dominated trades between Siam (ancient Thailand) and China since the reign of King Rama I, centered around Ratchawong Pier, while the construction of Yaowarat Road hadn’t begun until 1891 during the reign of King Rama V.  Today, Yaowarat is widely known as the kingdom’s largest center of gold trade and a great foodie destination. Yaowarat simply has two faces: If you visit Yaowarat during the day, what you see along both sides of this one and a half kilometer road are shops selling gold, Chinese herbs, fruits and Chinese restaurants serving authentic cuisine. But if you visit Yaowarat after sunset, the road turns into a street food heaven where a number of food trucks prepare you marvelous food, from Chinese fried noodles to iced Chinese dessert, you hardly find elsewhere.

Source: http://www.tourismthailand.org